Fearless
Mar18

Fearless

Nothing paralyzes us more than fear. Besides love, sex and the drive to survive no other human emotion is more potent or pervasive. We are all afraid. Afraid of being alone. Afraid of death. Afraid of failure.  Whatever it may be our fears never go away. Just recently I had engaging conversations with two friends of mine who confided in me that where they were in life, if you had told them they would be where they are now, 10 years ago, they would not have believed you. They saw themselves as intelligent, smart and college educated go-getters ready to take on the world. But somewhere between then and now plans didn’t quite turn out right. The jobs they have are dead end, have them miserable, and don’t really allow them to apply their real and true talents. Yet for one reason, and one particular reason only, they stay where they are. Fear. They are afraid to leave their jobs. They are afraid of not getting a paycheck. They are afraid of the unknown. So fear keeps them in a place where they are utterly unhappy and unfulfilled. This story is by no means unusual.  Thousands if not millions of people everyday don’t live the life they want because of fear. What’s the kicker is that fear will never, ever go away. The trick is learning how to embrace your fear and make it work for, not against you.  That, my friends, is not easy though. It takes constant confrontation of fear, daily facing it in the mirror, religiously kicking it’s ass and refusing to let it wrestle you down and then pin you to the ground. It’s an incessant effort to keep it from swallowing you whole – day in and day out. During one of my more recent fear conquering moments I decided to attend the 99% conference by myself in NYC this past April.  Now anyone familiar with NY knows that it can be one the most intimidating cities in the world. Its big. Its fast. Its unapologetic. It doesn’t stop to hold your hands, pat you on the back and help you cross the street. While at the conference I met a phenomenal woman named Ishita Gupta who told me that she was participating in Seth Godin’s alternative MBA program.  I found just the sound of it fascinating.  In the process of informing me about his program, she also told me about the project she was working on – an ebook called Fear.less. I loved the idea. Stories of what fear means to people and how they overcome it. After the workshop we were attending...

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Hello, I’m a producer, now get use to it
Mar18

Hello, I’m a producer, now get use to it

Ok, let’s go on a field trip to ancient times (circa 1998). Before the ipod, before Youtube, before MySpace, before blogs. Matter of fact September of that year Google is actually founded by Sergy Brin and Larry page (so ‘Googling’ wasn’t even a part of our lexicon yet).  So at this point hours upon hours of time spent online had yet to become a huge part of our day to day. And up to this point (and for most of that century) our opportunities to actively participate in the market was nonexistent. The corporations pretty much were the ones with the best opportunities to, create, generate, communicate and disseminate content. So now, just barely 10 years later, we are just about living in another universe. We have a generation of kids who have no idea what life was like without a laptop. Many of us can’t even remember what we did when we didn’t have a cellphone. I mean can any of us contemplate our businesses without a website?!? Now As a result of the last 10 years the role of the consumer has evolved and changed dramatically. The relationship between those who buy, and those who sell has morphed into something different altogether. in 2009 the role of the producer is no longer just for the upper echelons of those in the business and creative world. Every single person with a computer and a camera is now, in effect, a producer. And this constitutes millions of people. The reason that this is noteworthy isn’t just because we can now all produce/create our own networks of people across the world, or that music groups can bypass record companies altogether and can produce their own bodies of work and distribute them directly to their fans, or that individuals can produce personal videos and send theme directly to their friends, families and colleagues. It’s because when you put this all together it is literally changing the DNA of our socio-cultural and business interactions. The even bigger issue is that as these changes continue to evolve big business wants to try to take the old ways of doing things and simply fit them inside the new ways.  Nope.  Not going to happen.  That’s like trying to put a square inside of a triangle. Two different shapes. Two different ideas. Two different realities. The consumer-producer is an idea here to stay. The sooner businesses acknowledge this shift and begin to perform the right experiments that will help them to successfully leverage these new ideas the better position they will be in to thrive in the new...

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